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dc.creatorTošković, Dobrivoje
dc.creatorKovačević, Branislava
dc.creatorBajić, Tanja
dc.date.accessioned2019-04-01T07:00:54Z
dc.date.available2019-04-01T07:00:54Z
dc.date.issued2013
dc.identifier.isbn978-86-80329-76-5
dc.identifier.urihttps://raumplan.iaus.ac.rs/handle/123456789/422
dc.description.abstractThe towns in the tropical climate zone are characterized by their bioclimatic factors, which are repeated around the world in the function of geographical features and climate dependent differences among the large regional areas. In these regions, the space in its synthetic form, through it’s vastness, warmth, sandstorms and the shortage of drinking water, at present represents a unique determinant dictating the structure and shape of these settlements, architecture of buildings, the shaping of open spaces, and consequently people’s behaviour. Certain spatial occurrences can unwillingly provoke some changes which can establish new systems of physical relationships. Hence, climate has to be taken into account before the conceptualization of a project as a whole, as well as in its elements. The example of Calcutta, which is in a warm humid zone, shows the sustainable development characteristics. However, there are examples which do not comply with the requirements of climate, such as the case of Islamabad. Having this problem in mind, the authors of a project are faced with the question: how to start with regard to climate? The transformation of the climatic data into the specifications for buildings is relatively easy if the weather is invariably dry or wet. However, a large number of settlements have a mixed climate requiring an adequate approach. An irresponsible designer makes his decisions on the basis of his intuition and thus transfers the risk to the client. In order to eliminate these difficulties Carl Mahoney has developed a simple set of tables for showing climate information. In that context, the steps needed for completion of these tables are shown. Geoffrey Bawa shows a good example of the adaptation of architecture to the bioclimatic conditions. Finally, the concrete benefit of these analyses is shown on the examples such as: 1- Layout of buildings for warm and humid climate and 2 - Layout of buildings for warm and dry climate.en
dc.language.isoensr
dc.publisherBelgrade : Institute of architecture and urban & spatial planning of Serbiasr
dc.relationinfo:eu-repo/grantAgreement/MESTD/Technological Development (TD or TR)/36035/RS//sr
dc.rightsopenAccesssr
dc.sourceProceedings of the 2nd International Scientific Conference Regional Development, Spatial Planning and Strategic Governance - RESPAG 2013, Belgrade, May 22-25, 2013sr
dc.subjectsustainablesr
dc.subjectspatial developmentsr
dc.subjectclimatesr
dc.subjectconditionssr
dc.subjectdrysr
dc.subjecthumidsr
dc.titleSustainable spatial development under the conditions of dry, humid and mixed climate on the examples of some tropical countriesen
dc.typeconferenceObjectsr
dc.rights.licenseARRsr
dcterms.abstractБајић, Тања; Ковачевић, Бранислава; Тошковић, Добривоје;
dc.citation.spage871
dc.citation.epage892
dc.citation.rankM31
dc.description.otherKeynote paper presented at the 2nd International Scientific Conference “Regional development, spatial planning and strategic governance" - RESPAG, 22-25. May 2013, IAUS, Belgrade M31en
dc.identifier.fulltexthttps://raumplan.iaus.ac.rs//bitstream/id/1210/Toskovic_Kovacevic_Bajic_Respag2013_Sustainable_spatial_development_tropical_countries.pdf
dc.type.versionpublishedVersionsr


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