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dc.creatorDanilović Hristić, Nataša
dc.creatorStefanović, Nebojša
dc.creatorMilijić, Saša
dc.date.accessioned2022-11-01T10:12:24Z
dc.date.available2022-11-01T10:12:24Z
dc.date.issued2021
dc.identifier.isbn978-1-78466-447-3
dc.identifier.isbne 978-1-78466-448-0
dc.identifier.issn1743-3541 (on-line)
dc.identifier.urihttp://raumplan.iaus.ac.rs/handle/123456789/701
dc.description.abstractThe paper is a presentation of the evolution of the treatment of urban public land in the urban planning and design of the regenerated waterfront area, in different social conditions. The authors assess the certainty of achieving high-quality urban space, by comparing the circumstances and aspects of the public domain. For several decades, urban plans have declared a change of land use for the attractive Sava river basin (and the Danube) in Belgrade, with the purpose of relocating industrial warehouses and traffic facilities such as train and bus stations. In order to initiate the process of regenerating a new area of the city, between the historical core and the newest and most modern part of the city, at the end of the 20th century local and international urban planners and architects were invited to propose uses and forms for the future waterfront skyline in the so-called “Project for the 3rd Millennium”. The purpose of the project was to produce a multifunctional connection with the river between two parts of the city, both different in their development concepts. The accent was on the public domain: culture, education, entertainment, and tourism, which included planning new buildings for museums, venues for opera and ballet, and concert halls, as well as scientific centers, hotels, etc., with pedestrian promenades and greenery. Unfortunately, mainly because of the political situation and economic crisis, but also because of unrealistic ideas and foundations of the concept, the implementation failed. The future development depended on political will and demanded enormous investment, and it also had to wait for the next three decades. Belgrade’s Waterfront project started several years ago is based on this general idea to change the area’s appearance, but with significant exceptions. It is officially a result of foreign investment, and the concept was not a result of open urban competition, but rather based on a 3D model developed abroad, in addition to which, a percentage of public land was given over for residential and commercial structures, and the height of some buildings changed the skyline of Belgrade’s hill completely. All of these issues have been bitterly criticized by the professional and wider public.sr
dc.language.isoensr
dc.publisherSouthampton : WIT Presssr
dc.relationinfo:eu-repo/grantAgreement/MESTD/inst-2020/200006/RS//sr
dc.rightsopenAccesssr
dc.rights.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dc.sourceWIT Transactions on Ecology and the Environment, Sustainable City 2021sr
dc.subjectwaterfrontsr
dc.subjectregenerationsr
dc.subjectpublic landsr
dc.subjecturban competitionsr
dc.subjecturban plansr
dc.titleAspects of the public domain in regenerating waterfronts: a case study of Belgrade’s waterfront, Serbiasr
dc.typeconferenceObjectsr
dc.rights.licenseBYsr
dc.citation.volume253
dc.citation.spage173
dc.citation.epage181
dc.citation.rankM33
dc.description.other15th International Conference on Urban Regeneration and Sustainability, Sustainable City 2021, October 5th–7th, 2021, Bilbao, Spainsr
dc.identifier.doi10.2495/SC210151
dc.identifier.fulltexthttp://raumplan.iaus.ac.rs/bitstream/id/2921/WIT_2021.pdf
dc.type.versionpublishedVersionsr


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